GENDER ECONOMIC EQUITY AND THE FUTURE OF WORK - A Future of Work that Works for Women

Future of Work debate has been more centered on robots than on workers. The excessive focus on automation and technology’s potential displacement of jobs has neglected other trends that are also re-shaping the labor market as we know it. Digitalization and the gig economy, demographic changes and the associated care crisis, and the demand of new skills are equally important and will have a major impact on how we understand and carry out work. Critically, evidence suggests that these trends have specific implications for gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Read More
GENDER ECONOMIC EQUITY: AN IMPERATIVE FOR THE G20

Gender economic equity is an imperative for the global economy, including the countries represented by the G20. From a human right’s perspective, there is little question that closing gender gaps is the right thing to do. Moreover, a growing body of work argues that reducing gender inequality is economically beneficial, making the case that encouraging female economic participation, improving access to quality child care, and equitable professional opportunities in the job market can yield significant economic returns.

Read More
The Imperative of Addressing Care Needs for G20 countries

This document outlines the position of a group of research and non-governmental organizations on care needs and care policies in the G20 countries. It provides a summary of why addressing care needs is fundamental for women’s economic empowerment and labour market participation and frames these policies in terms of protecting the right to care and be cared for. We call for more effort to recognize, reduce, redistribute and represent unpaid care work and to protect the rights of paid care workers. We provide a number of examples of successful policy and programme initiatives for G20 countries to consider expanding in their own domestic policy agenda as well as their development assistance to further women’s economic empowerment globally.

Read More
GENDER ECONOMIC EQUITY Achieving "25 by 25": Actions to make Women's Labour Inclusion a G20 Priority

While women's labour insertion has significantly increased, wide gender gaps persist: women partipate less in labour markets, their employment conditions are worse, they face glass walls and ceilings and they are discriminated by the law. Achieving gender equity is not only a moral imperative, but it also key for growth and development. The G20 countries have committed to reduce the gap in labour participation 25% by 2025, yet progress has been slim and thus innovative solutions need to be implemented. This document aims to provide policy recommendations to achieve this goal and bridge gender gaps in the world of work.

Read More
“Womenomics” linking gender equality and economic growth

The Womenomics initiative seeks to enhance economic growth in Japan through improved gender parity in the workforce. It includes efforts to ease barriers to female employment outside the home, promote women to leadership positions, and close the gender pay gap.  Recent government policies to support the initiative have included a labor reform law, expanding day care facilities, and a law requiring action plans from companies of a certain size to increase female employment.

Read More
Demonstrating commitment and leadership on equal pay an EPIC Pledging Event

This event aims to accelerate the pace towards achieving equal pay for work of equal value, aligning with SDG 8.5 and SDG 5. One year after the launch of EPIC, global leaders, including Heads of State, CEOs of multinational companies, Heads of employers’ and workers’ organizations, and representatives of renowned universities and civil society organizations are coming together to publicly demonstrate their commitment to work together under the EPIC umbrella by making a pledge. 

Read More
There is growing evidence that women’s empowerment and gender equality has a multiplier effect on families, communities, businesses and sustainable economies

To guide business on empowering women and advancing gender equality in the workplace, marketplace and community, the UN Global Compact and UN Women developed the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), launched in 2010. The Seven Principles offer a holistic framework based on real-life practices for business to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment. Beyond positive impacts for a company’s direct operations, implementing the WEPs contributes to a range of targets under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). To date, over 1,800 CEOs from around the world have signed the CEO Statement of Support and have committed to continuous leadership and improvement on gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Read More
Women in management positions exclusively in the private sector is scarce globally and in the MENA region in particular

There is no doubt that women have made important gains in the global economy. Today, a third of the world’s enterprises are run by women and their management skills are increasingly recognized. There is increased evidence and recognition that gender balanced and diverse management teams at all levels of hierarchies produce positive business outcomes. Improved labour market participation rates of women is increasingly correlated with higher levels of growth and gross domestic product. Yet, gender stereotypes across all social and cultural contexts limit women’s economic contribution and benefits. Thus, the enormous talent pool that women represent with their ever-higher levels of education goes largely untapped.

Read More
Gendered Approach to the High Level Political Forum 2018

Women’s economic empowerment is a pre-requisite for inclusive and equitable economic growth. A powerful lever for change, women’s economic empowerment can drive gender equality outcomes and broader intergenerational benefits for women, their children, households and communities. Evidence tells us that women who are economically empowered have greater access to income and economic assets, better control over their own economic gains and more equitable decision-making power to translate these gains into social, economic, and health benefits for themselves and their families.

Read More
Gender pay gap costs global economy $160tn, says World Bank study

Equal pay, equal hours and equal participation in the workforce could lead to a global wealth jump of $23,620 a person, as well as creating knock-on benefits such as lower malnutrition and child mortality rates, said the report.

Using data from 141 countries, economists analysed the potential skills, education, training and future worth of each person in the workforce, then compared those so-called “lifetime earnings” to generate estimated global losses.

Read More
Economic recommendations from the gender equality advisory council for Canada's G7 presidency

Women’s economic empowerment is a pre-requisite for inclusive and equitable economic growth. A powerful lever for change, women’s economic empowerment can drive gender equality outcomes and broader intergenerational benefits for women, their children, households and communities. Evidence tells us that women who are economically empowered have greater access to income and economic assets, better control over their own economic gains and more equitable decision-making power to translate these gains into social, economic, and health benefits for themselves and their families.

Read More
Ring the Bell for Gender Equality kicks off at Nasdaq, New York

Nasdaq strongly believes that women’s empowerment is an essential lever for global sustainability and is imperative for creating inclusive, prosperous economies that lead to success for women and men, families and communities, businesses and the world at large. Signing the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs)—a set of international standards that businesses can follow, Nasdaq will continue its efforts to enhance diversity and inclusion in the workplace and draw attention to this issue of the broader society.

Read More
Gender equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

This report by UN Women, Turning Promises into Action, comes at a critical time. More than two years into the life of the 2030 Agenda, it calls for dramatic advances in statistics, financing and policies for gender equality, as well as more determined steps towards democratic governance and accountability. Based on robust data and expert analysis, the report takes stock of where we stand on key aspects of gender equality globally; tells us what is needed to monitor progress meaningfully; and provides wide- ranging recommendations for change.

Read More
Gender Equality in Employment as a Fundamental Human Right. Why is important to address gender inequality in employment?

Gender equality is a fundamental human right. At the same time it also makes good economic sense because it means using the country’s human capital more efficiently. It can have profound benefits not just for women themselves but also for families, communities and national economies.

Read More
Maternity Protection and Workers with Family Responsibilities in the Formal and Informal Economy of Ghana. Practices, Gaps and Measures for Improvement

Following the Millennium Development Declaration, the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda set out a number of goals aimed at ending poverty, ensuring healthy lives and well- being, achieving gender equality and women’s economic empowerment, promoting decent work and reducing inequalities. Ghana played a major role at both national and international levels in de ning the post-2015 development agenda and is committed to a development that ‘leaves no one behind’

Read More
Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC)

Led by ILO, UN Women and the OECD, the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) is a multi-stakeholder coalition to contribute to the achievement of SDG target 8.5 focusing on equal pay between women and men for work of equal value.

“By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value”
Read More
Economic crisis lends unexpected support to families in some countries

As part of fiscal consolidation drives, some countries, including Estonia and Lithuania, reduced the period of maternity and paternity leave or the level of benefits, if only temporarily. In other countries, such as Greece, Latvia and Romania reduction in the level of the minimum wage or weakening of the system of collective bargaining due to new laws following fiscal consolidation measures resulted in an erosion of the level of maternity benefits. 

Read More